Thursday, September 18, 2014

Cooking

My latest cooking misadventure was trying to make a pork tenderloin. It comes in a plastic wrapped with instructions, but even though I followed the instructions, the plastic popped. Also, the middle of the tenderloin didn't cook at all.

I also tried cooking a tri-tip steak, which turned out okay, but you couldn't tell because of the awful gravy. The gravy had way too much salt, and yes, I'm one of those people who dislikes having salt on everything. If food companies would stop putting salt on things that don't need it--cereal and cheese, for example--that would be great.

The problem with cooking the steak in the oven is that I had to cook potato casserole in the oven at the same time. The casserole recipe says 350 degrees for 30 minutes, while the steak says 375 degrees for 40 minutes. I didn't have enough time to do them separately, so I cooked them both at 350 degrees, and I left the steak in for an extra ten minutes. Is that a good idea? Is there any good way to convert cooking times? Like...two hours at 350 degrees equals one hour at 700 degrees?

Tonight is turkey burritos, and I hope turkey cooks the same way beef does, because otherwise I am in trouble. But that's okay, kind of, because I still can't brown beef correctly yet. Whenever I try, instead of breaking up into tiny pieces, the beef breaks up into little slices. And most of the time, the fourth of the meat that cooks first is burned, by the time the final fourth is cooked.

2 comments:

Emily said...

If you're cooking ground turkey in a pan it should cook up the same as beef. My only advice would be to add a bit of cooking oil to the pan before you start cooking the turkey. It's not as fatty as beef so your meat might dry out if you skip that step.

As for altering cooking times/temperatures in your oven, that's definitely possible. You basically do what you did with the steak but if you want a guide for how to create a formula there are some good instructions here:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/536192-how-to-convert-cooking-times-to-new-temperatures/

Lauren said...

After a while, you will get the right time for cooking in your oven. Every one really is different. Try using a thermometer you stick into the meat. The temperature for cooked-through chicken is 180deg I think. You probably should double check me on that though:).